COVID-19: How to Clean Your Phone

There has been an explosion of information, comments and opinions on COVID-19 on the internet and social media. We believe that on serious topics in general, and on public health matters in particular, it is essential to rely on facts and seek credible, expert information. Our mission at Healthy Matters remains to bring you the best information, so you can make the best choices for you and your family. 


In 2011, a study at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found that 16% of the 400 phones they sampled had traces of e-coli, a bacteria found in the small intestine. If that wasn’t bad enough, scientists now believe that COVID-19 can survive on surfaces for up to 72 hours. Many of us have now gotten into the habit of sanitizing everything around us but what about the object in our lives some of us never let go of? Not to worry, here’s your complete guide on sanitizing your phone. 

Various phone companies like Apple and Samsung were initially saying that using antibacterial wipes were too harsh for devices but they have recently come out and said that they’re safe to use, after all. Furthermore, a reporter at the Wall Street Journal proved recently that cleaning your phone with an antibacterial wipe or alcohol solution barely damages the phone’s oleophobic coating, (which repels oil and fingerprints), even when done everyday for 2 years!

Nevertheless, here are some gentle, yet effective, ways to clean your device. 

Giving your phone a deep clean

  • Turn off your device and remove the case. 
  • Use a microfiber towel and wipe down the device to get rid of fingerprints or anything that may be stuck to it. The grip of the microfiber towel will lift any germs or dust more effectively than a paper towel.
  • Reach for an anti-bacterial wipe (like a lysol wipe) or a paper towel sprayed with a 70% alcohol solution and wipe down your device. Make sure that you’ve squeezed out the excess product before so as to not completely soak the phone. 
  • Let your phone dry for a minimum of 5 minutes.
  • Grab a fresh microfiber towel or paper towel and wipe down the excess product left behind. 
  • Finally, apply the same process to your phone case.

Giving your phone a quick clean

Obviously, most of us don’t have the patience to thoroughly clean all of our devices several times a day or everyday. That being said, a quick wipe down of your phone is really important especially if you’re using it when you’re out and about. 

  • Wipe your phone down with a 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe or an antibacterial wipe.
  • Let it dry for a minimum of 5 minutes.

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Cleaning your phone using UV lights

What UV light sanitizers do is emit specific wavelengths of UV light that break the bonds between the molecules of the bacteria’s DNA, thus killing or damaging the bacteria. Amongst other studies, a study at Columbia University in 2018 found that it successfully rendered the H1N1 flu virus ineffective. 

A few of those exist on the market and usually go for about $900, here are some of the better known ones:

Casetify

Casetify UV Sanitizer

Phonesoap

PhoneSoap UV Sanitizer

3 best ways to keep our devices virus free

  1. Avoid pulling out your device on public transportation
  2. Avoid bringing your phone into the bathroom
  3. Quickly sanitize your hands before using your phone

It is important to note that the frequency with which you clean your device should reflect how often you go outside and potentially could contract COVID-19. Ideally, if you’re going outside frequently and use public transportation, you should clean your phone a lot more often. 

We hope that this short guide will help keep your phone germ-free and give you some much needed peace of mind during this time. Subscribe to our newsletter for more information about keeping you and your loved ones healthy!

This article was independently written by Healthy Matters and is not sponsored. It is informative only and not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be relied upon for specific medical advice.