Your IVF Guide in Hong Kong | Public Versus Private Options and Costs

According to The Council on Human Reproductive Technology, in Hong Kong an estimated one in six couples have difficulty conceiving. In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) is an assisted reproductive treatment and it is the most well-known for infertility related issues.
 
If you are currently exploring In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) services in Hong Kong or just curious about this option, we are here to assist you with all the information you need regarding the specifics including the costs through the private and public systems, the eligibility requirements, and where to go in Hong Kong.
 
Healthy Matters’ IVF guide is brought to you in collaboration with specialist in reproductive medicine, Dr. Patrick Sai Lock Chan 陳世樂醫生, to make sure we bring you the most accurate and up to date information.
 
 

IVF provider options in Hong Kong

Under Hong Kong law only legally married heterosexual couples are able to access assisted reproductive treatments; it is not legal for same-sex couples. When you are reviewing your assisted fertility options, there are two routes you can take; the private and the public systems. Each option has their differences when it comes to cost, waiting time, and flexibility. While the private route offers more flexibility, it is substantially more expensive; the public route is stricter, more limited, and waiting times can be long and challenging, but the cost is more affordable. Read on below to learn more about each option.
 
 
 

Private Sector IVF in Hong Kong

There are many private clinics and hospitals across the city that provide fertility services. The private system requires you to be legally married, and both parties must consent to the procedure. There is no age or citizenship requirement for the private sector option. With this route, you may experience shorter waiting periods (may vary per doctor), more flexibility, choice, and complete follow through when it comes to the reproductive specialist doctor of your choosing.
 
Here is a complete list of private hospitals/clinics that provide IVF services. 
Licensed of Private Centres that Provide IVFHong Kong Address & Locations
Hong Kong Assisted Reproduction Centre1502, Henley Building, 5 Queen’s Road Central
Hong Kong Reproductive Medicine Centre LimitedSuites 1228-30, Ocean Centre, Harbour City, 5 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
IVF Centre/ Obstetrics & Gynaecology Centre, Hong Kong Sanatorium & HospitalIVF Centre, 6/F, Li Shu Pui Block, O&G Centre; O&G Centre, 5/F, Li Shu Pui Block; Molecular Pathology Laboratory, 1/F, Li Shu Fan Block, Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, 2 Village Road, Happy Valley
Prolivfic A.R.T Centre16/F, New World Tower 2, 18 Queen’s Road , Central
The IVF ClinicSuites 1313, Central Tower, 28 Queen’s Road Central
Union Reproductive Medicine Centre1-2/F, Main Building, Union Hospital, 18 Fu Kin Street, Tai Wai, N.T.
Union Reproductive Medicine Centre (Tsim Sha Tsui)Unit 1706-07 17/F & Unit 1804-05 18/F Mira Place Tower A,132 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
Victory ‘ART’ Laboratory LimitedSuite 1412-1425, Prince’s Building, 10 Chater Road, Central
Victory ‘ART’ Laboratory Limited (TST)Room 1101-02, 11/F, 26 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
* Source: from the Council of Human Reproductive Technology‘s list of licensed centres as at 12 August 2018. You can find the Council’s complete list of licensed centres here. While some of the listed centres do not provide IVF services, they provide other fertility related services.   
 
 

Public Sector IVF in Hong Kong

Within the public system there are three public hospitals that offer fertility treatment: Kwong-Wah Hospital (Dr. Stephen Chow Chun-Kay Assisted Reproduction Center), Prince of Wales Hospital (CUHK ART Unit), and Queen Mary Hospital (HKU CARE).
 
CUHK ART Unit
Ward 9/F, Block E/F, Prince of Wales
Hospital, Shatin, N.T
Li Ka Shing O&G Specialist Clinic, Level 2,
Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T.
1/F, Block E/F, Prince of Wales Hospital,
Shatin, N.T.
3/F & 5/F, Operation Theatre, Main
Clinical Block and Trauma Centre
(Extension Block), Prince of Wales
Hospital, Shatin, N.T.
HKU CARE
K5N, 5/F, Block K, Queen Mary Hospital,
Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong 
Dr. Stephen Chow Chun-Kay Assisted Reproduction Center
25 Waterloo Road, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon, Hong Kong
 
Within Hong Kong’s public sector both public and private routes are provided. Requirements for the public route require couples to be legally married, and the female partner must be a Hong Kong citizen under the age of 40 at time of interest. The above criteria of age and citizenship for the private route within the public sector do not apply, and while marriage is not a requirement for the first consultation, you must be legally married when undergoing treatment. Waiting times are extremely long for both sectors and appointment times are very selective for regular check-up procedures, and there is also no guarantee you will see the same doctor from start to finish.
 
 

How much does IVF cost in Hong Kong?

 
Public Route within the Public Sector – $ 
The public system is not free but heavily subsidized by the Hospital Authority. The cost of IVF at the Prince of Wales Hospital ranges from approximately HK$10,000 to HK$24,500 with ICSI and frozen embryo storage (a detailed price list through the public system can be found here). At Queen Mary Hospital prices for IVF treatment range from HK$11,500-19,500, details can be found here.
 
Private Route within the Public Sector – $$
The teaching hospitals offer a private option with a shorter wait time, but higher fees. At the Prince of Wales Hospital, the estimated fee per cycle is HK$37,360 to HK$79,310 with ICSI and frozen embryo storage (a detailed price list through the private-public system can be found here). For Queen Mary Hospital prices range is HK$85,600- HK$102,000, find more info here and here.
 
Private Sector – $$$
The costs of doing fertility treatment through a private hospital or clinic are substantially higher than going through the public health services. Plus, private sector fees are not standardized and vary depending on the provider and doctor. IVF packages are usually around HK$150,000 per cycle, dependent on the facility and services required (all costs are likely on a per-cycle basis).
 
 

Does insurance cover IVF?

According to health insurance advisor AD MediLink, in Hong Kong the vast majority of health insurance plans do not cover IVF. Only a handful of high-end international plans will cover IVF which is usually included as a maternity benefit. Contact their experts at hello@admedilink.hk if you have questions.
 
Depending on the plan there is a waiting period between 12 to 24 months, which means you cannot be reimbursed for IVF related medical costs for the 1st and 2nd year of your medical insurance policy. Furthermore, fertility issues must not be pre-existing when enrolling, and coverage is usually capped at US$3,000 per cycle (some plans impose co-insurance and a limited number of cycles). Considering how expensive IVF treatment is in Hong Kong, this only covers a very small portion of the overall cost.
 
 
Whether you are having trouble conceiving or with infertility, understanding your options is the best way to begin the process of planning your next steps to starting a family.
 
 
 
 
Main article photo courtesy of Unsplash (David Nunez). 
Dr. Patrick Sai Lock Chan 陳世樂醫生 graduated from the University of Melbourne medical school. After completing residency at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, he returned to Hong Kong to work for Hospital Authority. He worked for more than 10 years in public sector and during this period completed higher training in minimal invasive gynecological surgery. He has further sub-specialized in reproductive medicine at the Monash IVF Centre, Australia. Currently, Dr. Patrick Chan is in private practice providing obstetrics care and fertility treatment.
This article was independently written by Healthy Matters and not sponsored. It is informative only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.