Kids’ Travel First Aid Kit | What Every Parent Should Pack

Travelling with kids is stressful enough. And while we want to encourage their adventurous side, sometimes that comes with a few injuries along the way. Especially when we’re on the road (or plane, train or automobile), we want to make sure we’re ready to face any little bumps, bruises and minor illnesses along the way.
 
 

Child travel medical kit

We checked in with Dr. Lily Wong 黃淑婷醫生, family practitioner at The London Medical Clinic, for a checklist of what we parents should be bringing along to keep our families healthy and hopefully, happy.
 
This list will vary depending on your destination. If you’re traveling to a place where you know you can easily access items as you need them, perhaps you can leave a few off the list. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.
 
 

Child travel first aid tools

  • Tweezers – running around outside all day is dangerous, splinter-inducing work.
  • A few different sizes of plasters – and if you’re going to be spending time at the beach or pool, spring for the waterproof kind to make everyone’s life a bit happier.
 
 

Child travel first aid medications

Take all medications as per instructions and adjust for baby, toddler, child or adult as necessary.
  • Paracetamol, ibuprofen or acetaminophen liquid or suppositories to relieve pain and fever.
  • Anti-histamine liquids and creams.
  • Antiseptic cream or iodine.
  • Sunscreen.
  • Insect repellant.
  • Probiotics – the whole family should take a non-refrigerated probiotic daily to avoid tummy bugs.
  • Anti-diarrhea (such as kaolin mixture and anti-nausea medications (such as gravol tablets or suppositories.)
  • Oral rehydration salts – in case of vomiting, diarrhea or excessive sweating, take some oral rehydration salts to prevent dehydration.
  • Aqua ear – if your family is spending a lot of time in the water, it’s worth bringing along something to prevent water-related ear problems.
 
 
See our Baby First Aid Kit article for more information on general first aid kits.

Baby First-Aid Kit | Pediatrician Approved Checklist

 
 

Pre-departure advice

Check the travel advice for the country you’re visiting. Quite a few countries have either required or recommended vaccinations. A lot of governments have sites with required/recommended health and safety information by destination country (Australia, Canada, UK, and US).
 
 
Before you go to your destination, do some quick research to see where you would go (i.e. international standard hospital or clinic) and the ambulance service you would call in case of emergency. Chances are, your medical events will consist of a splinter or stubbed toe but you want to be as prepared as possible!
 
 
Dr. Lily Wong 黃淑婷醫生 is a family practitioner at The London Medical Clinic. She is both a registered general practitioner and pharmacist in the UK and HK. Having lived and worked as a general practitioner for many years in busy practices in London, she relocated to Hong Kong with her family a few years ago.  Dr. Wong has also been appointed Honorary Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Hong Kong University, for her teaching of medical students.
This article was independently written by Healthy Matters and not sponsored. It is informative only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.